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DIY Electro Guitar Kit

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Now: $35
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This totally rad, educational play kit will stimulate the mind and excite the ears. The 13-piece boxed set contains everything you need to build your very own mini axe guitar! The experience will teach your kiddo about basic circuitry and currents, and allow them to observe how to apply that knowledge to making music. Each kit contains: 6 strings, 4 plastic connections, 1 piezo pickup, 1 amplifier module, 1 speaker, and carboard pieces for the amp and guitar body. It is as fun to put togethe… See More

Description


This totally rad, educational play kit will stimulate the mind and excite the ears. The 13-piece boxed set contains everything you need to build your very own mini axe guitar! The experience will teach your kiddo about basic circuitry and currents, and allow them to observe how to apply that knowledge to making music. Each kit contains: 6 strings, 4 plastic connections, 1 piezo pickup, 1 amplifier module, 1 speaker, and carboard pieces for the amp and guitar body. It is as fun to put together as it is to play, and offers a hands on way for kids to pick up important STEAM skills. What’s more, it’s a great entry point for learning about more complex topics like music production, sound engineering, sound waves, and electronics. A truly superb gift for the kid with a curious mind or a budding Jimi Hendrix. Suitable for ages 8 and up


Cardboard, plastic, metal, electronics
Designed in the UK
7.09” l x 8.94” w x 1.42” h (box)
See box for care instructions

About Technology Will Save Us

Started in London in 2012, Tech Will Save Us is a 36-member team of good humans committed to making the world a better place by creating kits that combine the wonder of play with making and coding. Their award-winning make-it-yourself kits and digital tools help kids to make, play, code and invent using technology. Their mission is to spark the creative imagination of young people using hands-on technology. Collaborations with Google, Code Club, The Prince’s Trust and the BBC led to the micro:bit, a pocket-sized computer given to one million kids and used in over 40 countries.